Tag Archives: zazen

Practice of Meditation

My friend Jill recently starting asking me questions about Zen Buddhism, which has stoked my curiosity once more. I’ve been wondering what to do with this blog for quite some time now; I guess posting various stuff about things from Buddhism for the time being isn’t a bad use of the digital space here.

This excerpt is titled “Practice of Meditation” in Teachings of the Buddha: Revised and Expanded Edition edited by Jack Kornfield (Shambhala Press, pp. 150-152). The excerpt is from Dogen’s Fukanzazengi, translated by Senzaki and McCandless.

I have a huge man crush on Dogen, and I have always loved his very to-the-point sensible writing style when it comes to talking about meditating technique. In the West, we have a tendency to fetishize the practice of meditation; Dogen’s simple explanation punctures that fantasy and replaces it with something very mundane, but very real. As he writes, “The practice of meditation is not a method for the attainment of realization — it is enlightenment itself.” Now go meditate.

Truth is perfect and complete in itself. It is not something newly discovered; it has always existed. Truth is not far away; it is ever present. It is not something to be attained since not one of your steps lead away from it.

Do not follow the ideas of others, but learn to listen to the voice within yourself. Your body and mind will become clear and you will realize the unity of all things.

The slightest movement of your dualistic thought will prevent you from entering the palace of meditation and wisdom.

The Buddha meditated for six years, Bodhidharma for nine. The practice of meditation is not a method for the attainment of realization — it is enlightenment itself.

Your search among books, word upon word, may lead you to the depths of knowledge, but it is not the way to receive the reflection of your true self.

When you have thrown off your ideas as to mind and body, the original truth will fully appear. Zen is simply the expression of truth; therefore longing and striving are not the true attitudes of Zen.

To actualize the blessedness of meditation you should practice with pure intention and firm dedication. Your meditation room should be clean and quiet. Do not dwell in thoughts of good and bad. Just relax and forget that you are meditating. Do not desire realization since that thought will keep you confused.

Sit on a cushion in a manner as comfortable as possible, wearing loose clothing. Hold your body straight without leaning to the left or the right, forward or backward. Your ears should be in line with your shoulders, and your nose in a straight line with your navel. Keep your tongue at the roof of your mouth and close your lips. Keep your eyes slightly open, and breathe through your nostrils.

Before you begin meditation take several slow, deep breaths. Hold your body erect, allowing your breathing to become normal again. Many thoughts will crowd into your mind, ignore them, letting them go. If they persist be aware of them with the awareness which does not think. In other words, think non-thinking.

Zen meditation is not physical culture, nor is it a method to gain something material. It is peacefulness and blessedness itself. It is the actualization of truth and wisdom.

In your meditation you yourself are the mirror reflecting the solution of your problems. The human mind has absolute freedom within its true nature. You can attain your freedom intuitively. Do not work for freedom, rather allow the practice itself to be liberation.

When you wish to rest, move your body slowly and stand up quietly. Practice this meditation in the morning or in the evening, or at any leisure time during the day. You will soon realize that your mental burdens are dropping away one by one, and that you are gaining an intuitive power hitherto unnoticed.

There are thousands upon thousands of students who have practiced meditation and obtained its fruits. Do not doubt its possibilities because of the simplicity of the method. If you cannot find the truth right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?

Life is short and no one knows what the next moment will bring. Open your mind while you have the opportunity, thereby gaining the treasures of wisdom, which in turn you can share abundantly with others, bringing them happiness.

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Zazen and God

My wife has a hard time connecting with God. It’s not really her fault, and I don’t blame the Church either; she has a very different mindset which the general American LDS church culture cannot nurture. It’s simply an incompatibility between two completely different ways of approaching the world. So recently, I’ve been reading about other religious traditions to try and find a way to make it easier for her to find some kind of spiritual connection with God, and that’s when I hit upon zazen.

Buddhism’s core principles are simple – suffering exists because of desire. Desire creates action. When you eliminate desire (and thus, the need to act), then you eliminate suffering. Zen Buddhism believes the best way to achieve this type of enlightenment (“satori” in Zen Buddhism) is by sitting. You sit, and you slowly empty your mind so that it becomes like a still pond, reflecting reality. When you seek after your desires caused by attachment to the physical world, it is like flailing about in the pond, churning up the mud and dirt. Through sitting and stilling your mind, all of the mud and dirt settles to the bottom. You experience emotions, you observe your attachments to the world, and then you slowly cut those attachments away. It reminds me of the famous scripture in Doctrine and Covenants, “Be still, and know that I am God.” As you slowly peel away the facade of the physical world, you find what is behind, the Origin of All Things, and that is satori.

For my wife, she cannot take the idea of God and belief in Him simply on the basis of emotion. She realizes that she is an overly emotional person and that her emotions especially cannot be trusted. Zen, also, teaches that emotions are illusions, physical manifestations of our desires. But rather than suppressing these emotions, as some Western philosophies encourage, Zen teaches the student to sit, experience the emotions, and acknowledge them for what they are – illusions. Yet, God cannot be reached through logic alone, as our world is an incredibly illogical place. And so we’ve been looking for different ways to help her connect with the spiritual, and we’re hoping zazen might be it. As we sit, still our minds, and peel away the veneer, hopefully what we find on the other side is satori. Or, as we’re hoping, God.

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